4/26/2020

health VS. privacy?

democracy means, among other things, that a political structure (like a central or local government) guarantees some rights to the citizen. among these rights there's the right to stay healthy and to have her own privacy. in moments of emergency like the one we're currently living, this could mean a tricky decision to be made. i think you have already understood what i'm talking about.
an app on your smartphone is supposed to track all your movements but at the same time help save some lives.  is it correct? is this the right way to deal with the emergency? i don't have an answer. yet, in my opinion, health comes first. i don't care if someone is tracking me down. what concerns me more is that in a prospective like this, i would be obliged to own a smartphone and to keep it constantly with me, charged and functioning. i would be obliged to have a subscription contract with a cell company  paying a monthly fee to make sure that my smartphone is always online. i would be obliged to check constantly the battery level and to move around with cables, power adapters and a charger. and i'm definitely not used to live this way. still, i can understand that under some circumstances it may be necessary.
nonetheless, there's something i can't get: many people spend they whole spare time posting on social networks all kind of details about their private life. on a daily basis they post pictures and videos of themselves, their family, their house, the places they visit and of what they eat. then, they start moaning if they sense the possibility that their right to privacy has been in some ways violated, even if it's for reasons of health and security.
so what's the whole point of revealing daily (and willingly) almost anything about your life?
maybe big brother is watching you. or maybe not. but if you are part of this people, you are doing your best to get noticed.